North Carolina Public Charter Schools Association

Breaking News

  • Charters across America: What I saw in 2014

    Download the PDF file .

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  • Ryan Stein of LNC 2015 All-Star Scholar

    Ryan Stein of Lake Norman Charter and son of Adam and Shannon Stein, is a 2015 Charlotte Observer Senior of the Year finalist. He was nominated from schools in eight counties and will receive a $1,000 scholarship. READ MORE HERE…

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  • LBA Haynes Strand volunteers for charters!

    On Tuesday May 19th, LBA Haynes Strand closed all 3 office locations for the day to go out and volunteer at 4 North Carolina Charter Schools.  Our annual day of service, which is called “LBAHS Day”, allows for our employees to get out of the office and serve non-profit organizations or local schools in a […]

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  • An overview of the NC House K-12 education budget

    Similar to governor’s plan, the single largest K-12 increase is the $100 million allocation to fund school enrollment growth in FY 2015-16 and over $207 million for enrollment increases in FY 2016-17. Much of this would be used to pay for hundreds of new teaching positions. Read more here…

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  • Statewide issues

    “It’s not the intent to grab PTA money,” said Eddie Goodall, director of the N.C. Public Charter Schools Association. “If it is restricted and they say it is not to be shared with charters, then it wouldn’t be.” But otherwise it should be shared. “If someone gives a grant to the school system for the […]

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  • NCPCSA continues to grow!

    “Success by Association” May 13, 2015 To: Member Schools (listed below) From: Association Your Association continues to grow. Our billed revenue for the four and a half months year to date (we have a calendar fiscal year), is $212,000 compared to $148,000 a year ago for the same period, a 43% increase! Our billings have […]

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  • Beating Newark’s odds, KIPP charter network is poised to expand

    “In a city where almost half the students don’t graduate, nearly all its kids finish, and a remarkable 95 percent of them go on to college.” Read more here…

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